Disease Transmission: Direct Contact vs. Indirect Contact.

A zoonosis (plural zoonoses, or zoonotic diseases) is an infectious disease caused by a pathogen (an infectious agent, such as a bacterium, virus, parasite or prion) that has jumped from a non-human animal (usually a vertebrate) to a human. Typically, the first infected human transmits the infectious agent to at least one other human, who, in turn, infects others.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

The likelihood of an average person contracting a zoonotic disease from a cat is low, but individuals with immature or weakened immune systems are more susceptible to these diseases. This includes infants, individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the elderly, and people undergoing cancer chemotherapy or receiving other drugs that may suppress their immune systems.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a diverse group of communicable diseases that prevail in tropical and subtropical conditions in 149 countries and affect more than one billion people, costing developing economies billions of dollars every year. They mainly affect populations living in poverty, without adequate sanitation and in close contact with infectious vectors and domestic animals.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

SEOUL - First it was an outbreak of the coronavirus in Seoul's nightclub district. Cluster infections detected at a logistics centre, a door-to-door sales company targeting the elderly, a ping ping club, a car enthusiast club gathering near the Han River, and the latest, an overnight church camp, followed. South Korea, despite its initial success in flattening the infection curve in March due to.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Disease Reporting The diseases and conditions listed on this page are considered to have significant public health impact, and any confirmed or suspected cases must be reported promptly. Requirements for the timing of reporting, once the disease or condition is recognized or suspected, vary by disease.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Animal-human disease. About 60 percent of all human diseases and 75 percent of all emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, according to the researchers. Most human infections with zoonoses come.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Sandhoff's disease An autosomal recessive inherited disease similar to Tay-Sachs disease with the same signs, but differing in that both the enzymes hexosaminidase A and B are defective and it develops more rapidly and can be found among the general population. The main ocular manifestation is a whitish area in the central retina with a cherry-red spot which eventually fades and the optic disc.

Surveillance and Management of Zoonotic Disease Outbreaks.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People. Smallpox patients became contagious once the first sores appeared in their mouth and throat (early rash stage). They spread the virus when they coughed or sneezed and droplets from their nose or mouth spread to other people. They remained contagious until their last smallpox scab fell off.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Zoonotic diseases have been becoming increasingly diverse over time, but only a small number cause the majority of outbreaks in each decade: “From 1980 to 1990, 80% of all zoonotic disease outbreaks were caused by only 25% of potential zoonoses in the dataset, and only 22% and 21% of zoonoses from 1990 to 2000 and from 2000 to 2010, respectively.” The authors caution that zoonotic disease.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

To introduce the rickettsia, chlamydia and mycoplasma as distinct groups of degenerate bacteria. 2. To differentiate the rickettsia, chlamydia and mycoplasma on the basis of cell structure, metabolism, genetic characteristics, pathogenicity, routes of disease transmission and methods of diagnosis. Specific educational objectives (terms and concepts upon which you will be tested) 1. To define.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Tularemia, also known as rabbit fever, is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. Symptoms may include fever, skin ulcers, and enlarged lymph nodes. Occasionally, a form that results in pneumonia or a throat infection may occur. The bacterium is typically spread by ticks, deer flies, or contact with infected animals. It may also be spread by drinking contaminated.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

Start studying Zoonotic Disease. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

The Global Infectious Disease Threat and Its Implications for the United States. New and reemerging infectious diseases will pose a rising global health threat and will complicate US and global security over the next 20 years. These diseases will endanger US citizens at home and abroad, threaten US armed forces deployed overseas, and exacerbate social and political instability in key countries.

What is a zoonotic disease quizlet

A notifiable disease is any disease that is required by law to be reported to government authorities. The collation of information allows the authorities to monitor the disease, and provides early warning of possible outbreaks. In the case of livestock diseases, there may also be the legal requirement to destroy the infected livestock upon notification.

Zoonosis: Definition, Types, and Diseases List.

Direct contact infections spread when disease-causing microorganisms pass from the infected person to the healthy person via direct physical contact with blood or body fluids. Examples of direct contact are touching, kissing, sexual contact, contact with oral secretions, or contact with body lesions. Indirect contact infections spread when an infected person sneezes or coughs, sending.Definition. Bioterrorism is the deliberate release of viruses, bacteria, toxins or other harmful agents to cause illness or death in people, animals, or plants. These agents are typically found in nature, but could be mutated or altered to increase their ability to cause disease, make them resistant to current medicines, or to increase their ability to be spread into the environment.Any human in contact with an infected animal or disease vector is at risk. A vector is a disease carrier such as an insect or rodent that spreads the disease from an infected animal to an uninfected human. Disease incidence varies greatly with the region. Your risk for contracting a specific zoonotic diseases depends on your location.


Zoonotic diseases are an ever-present concern in small animal veterinary practice and are often overlooked. A variety of nonparasitic zoonotic diseases may be encountered in small animal practice, including cat scratch disease (bartonellosis), cat bite abscesses, rabies, leptospirosis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, salmonellosis, avian.Valley fever, also called coccidioidomycosis, is an infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides. The fungus is known to live in the soil in the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico and Central and South America. The fungus was also recently found in south-central Washington. People can get Valley fever by breathing in the microscopic fungal spores from the air, although most people.